Your Ticket Out

Client:
StubHub
  • "Machines"

    "Machines"

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    Every night people have to decide whether to go out to an amazing live event or stay home and be lame. StubHub would like people to decide to go out and not be lame more often. So we made two films following the lives of people who found themselves on opposite sides of that decision.

    Released: May 2017

    Tags:
    San Francisco, StubHub, Film
  • "Festival"

    "Festival"

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    Every night people have to decide whether to go out to an amazing live event or stay home and be lame. StubHub would like people to decide to go out and not be lame more often. So we made two films following the lives of people who found themselves on opposite sides of that decision.

    Released: May 2017

    Tags:
    San Francisco, StubHub, Film
  • Your Ticket Out

    Your Ticket Out

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    With TVs getting bigger, food delivery apps getting faster, and memory foam getting squishier, it’s never been harder to get out of the house. For StubHub, we quickly realized that StubHub isn’t competing with other ticket providers, they’re competing with people’s couches. This insight drove the campaign, “Your Ticket Out," which inspires people to get out and experience the world by showcasing the visceral excitement of a live event. 

    Released: June 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, StubHub, Film

"Heist"

Client:
Adobe
  • "Heist"

    In the past, Adobe showed what happened when cross-channel marketing experiences went bad. In our latest spot a new situation emerges—what happens when a bad scenario is met with a great customer experience?

    “Heist” is a 60-second bank-robbery spot with all the details of a summer blockbuster. It has the big shots and familiar chaos of Dog Day Afternoon. Nervous robbers, stammering bank tellers and the ever-present threat of the law. And most importantly, there's a twist: Adobe’s Experience Cloud software saves the day.

     

    Released: March 2017

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Adobe, Film

XFINITY Fast & Furious 8 Drive-Out Cinema

Client:
Comcast/XFINITY
  • XFINITY Fast & Furious 8 Drive-Out Cinema

    How do you tell people how fast XFINITY’s new gig-speed Internet is? You don’t. You have to let them feel it. 

    So we teamed up with the fastest film franchise, the Fast and the Furious, and surprised two XFINITY customers by putting them inside a reenactment of a chase scene from the latest film, The Fate of the Furious. 

    The reenacted chase was complete with the same cars from the movie, driven by the same stunt drivers through the same explosive stunts that characters Dom (Vin Diesel) and Letty (Michelle Rodriguez) experienced. Directed by Jeff Tremaine (Jackass and Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa), the reenactment for XFINITY was shot live in one take.

    Released: March 2017

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Comcast/XFINITY, Film

Poverty Line Prices

Client:
Tipping Point Community
  • Poverty Line Prices

    Poverty Line Prices

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    Imagine walking into a grocery store where every item is five times more expensive than it usually is. A store where milk is $24 and a monthly bus pass costs $365.

    That’s the unfortunate reality that the one in ten Bay Area families (788,000 individuals) living below the poverty line experiences every day. In large part due to high-paying jobs in Silicon Valley, the Bay Area’s median household income is $153,057—which, after taxes, is five times more than the earnings of those families living below the poverty line ($24,300). To raise awareness of this pay gap, we partnered with the Tipping Point to simulate the struggle of living below the poverty line.

    GS&P introduced “Poverty Line Prices” with a provocative film. We placed undercover cameras in a high-end San Francisco (Nob Hill) grocery store and filmed people’s reactions as they were charged prices five times higher than the real cost. 

    “The Bay Area is a tale of two cities: the haves and the have-nots,” said Rich Silverstein, co-chairman and partner at GS&P. “We wanted people to get a small sense of the reality of living below the poverty line so that they truly understand the importance of Tipping Point’s mission.” 

    We also created a coupon insert that features items with prices inflated by 500 percent. It will run in the San Francisco Chronicle on the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. The insert serves as a stark contrast to the Black Friday blockbuster discounts that typically appear in the issue. The campaign will drive to a mobile-first website, tippingpoint.org, that enables people to plug in their income to determine how expensive basic items seem for those living below the poverty line. On social networks, people are encouraged to share the campaign using the hashtag #PovertyLinePrices. 

    Released: November 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Tipping Point Community
  • Poverty Line Prices

    2 of 4
    Prev Next

    Imagine walking into a grocery store where every item is five times more expensive than it usually is. A store where milk is $24 and a monthly bus pass costs $365.

    That’s the unfortunate reality that the one in ten Bay Area families (788,000 individuals) living below the poverty line experiences every day. In large part due to high-paying jobs in Silicon Valley, the Bay Area’s median household income is $153,057—which, after taxes, is five times more than the earnings of those families living below the poverty line ($24,300). To raise awareness of this pay gap, we partnered with the Tipping Point to simulate the struggle of living below the poverty line.

    GS&P introduced “Poverty Line Prices” with a provocative film. We placed undercover cameras in a high-end San Francisco (Nob Hill) grocery store and filmed people’s reactions as they were charged prices five times higher than the real cost. 

    “The Bay Area is a tale of two cities: the haves and the have-nots,” said Rich Silverstein, co-chairman and partner at GS&P. “We wanted people to get a small sense of the reality of living below the poverty line so that they truly understand the importance of Tipping Point’s mission.” 

    We also created a coupon insert that features items with prices inflated by 500 percent. It will run in the San Francisco Chronicle on the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. The insert serves as a stark contrast to the Black Friday blockbuster discounts that typically appear in the issue. The campaign will drive to a mobile-first website, tippingpoint.org, that enables people to plug in their income to determine how expensive basic items seem for those living below the poverty line. On social networks, people are encouraged to share the campaign using the hashtag #PovertyLinePrices. 

    Released: November 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Tipping Point Community
  • Poverty Line Prices

    3 of 4
    Prev Next

    Imagine walking into a grocery store where every item is five times more expensive than it usually is. A store where milk is $24 and a monthly bus pass costs $365.

    That’s the unfortunate reality that the one in ten Bay Area families (788,000 individuals) living below the poverty line experiences every day. In large part due to high-paying jobs in Silicon Valley, the Bay Area’s median household income is $153,057—which, after taxes, is five times more than the earnings of those families living below the poverty line ($24,300). To raise awareness of this pay gap, we partnered with the Tipping Point to simulate the struggle of living below the poverty line.

    GS&P introduced “Poverty Line Prices” with a provocative film. We placed undercover cameras in a high-end San Francisco (Nob Hill) grocery store and filmed people’s reactions as they were charged prices five times higher than the real cost. 

    “The Bay Area is a tale of two cities: the haves and the have-nots,” said Rich Silverstein, co-chairman and partner at GS&P. “We wanted people to get a small sense of the reality of living below the poverty line so that they truly understand the importance of Tipping Point’s mission.” 

    We also created a coupon insert that features items with prices inflated by 500 percent. It will run in the San Francisco Chronicle on the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. The insert serves as a stark contrast to the Black Friday blockbuster discounts that typically appear in the issue. The campaign will drive to a mobile-first website, tippingpoint.org, that enables people to plug in their income to determine how expensive basic items seem for those living below the poverty line. On social networks, people are encouraged to share the campaign using the hashtag #PovertyLinePrices. 

    Released: November 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Tipping Point Community
  • Poverty Line Prices

    4 of 4
    Prev Next

    Imagine walking into a grocery store where every item is five times more expensive than it usually is. A store where milk is $24 and a monthly bus pass costs $365.

    That’s the unfortunate reality that the one in ten Bay Area families (788,000 individuals) living below the poverty line experiences every day. In large part due to high-paying jobs in Silicon Valley, the Bay Area’s median household income is $153,057—which, after taxes, is five times more than the earnings of those families living below the poverty line ($24,300). To raise awareness of this pay gap, we partnered with the Tipping Point to simulate the struggle of living below the poverty line.

    GS&P introduced “Poverty Line Prices” with a provocative film. We placed undercover cameras in a high-end San Francisco (Nob Hill) grocery store and filmed people’s reactions as they were charged prices five times higher than the real cost. 

    “The Bay Area is a tale of two cities: the haves and the have-nots,” said Rich Silverstein, co-chairman and partner at GS&P. “We wanted people to get a small sense of the reality of living below the poverty line so that they truly understand the importance of Tipping Point’s mission.” 

    We also created a coupon insert that features items with prices inflated by 500 percent. It will run in the San Francisco Chronicle on the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. The insert serves as a stark contrast to the Black Friday blockbuster discounts that typically appear in the issue. The campaign will drive to a mobile-first website, tippingpoint.org, that enables people to plug in their income to determine how expensive basic items seem for those living below the poverty line. On social networks, people are encouraged to share the campaign using the hashtag #PovertyLinePrices. 

    Released: November 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Tipping Point Community