Make a Masterpiece

Client:
Adobe
  • Make a Masterpiece

    Make a Masterpiece

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    Stock imagery is rarely talked about in a positive light. Adobe is setting out to change that. Introducing “Make a Masterpiece.” Adobe challenged four digital artists from its Behance artist community to faithfully and intricately re-create lost, stolen or destroyed art using just Adobe Stock photography inside the Creative Cloud. 

    The artists and their assigned pieces of art included Karla Cordova (Ecuador) and Frida Kahlo’s The Wounded Table; Jean-Charles Debroize (France) and Caravaggio’s Saint Matthew and the Angel; Mike Campau (US) and Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s Cathedral Towering Over a Town; and Ankur Patar (India) and Rembrandt van Rijn’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee.

    The result is four re-creations of lost masterpieces created from thousands of Adobe Stock photographs that, without a second glance, could pass for the originals. 

    The “Make a Masterpiece” experience is housed at http://www.adobestockmasterpiece.com/ and features the finished masterpieces as well as behind-the-scenes footage. Clicking on each masterpiece reveals the individual stock photos used in their creation. 

     

    Released: June 2017

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Adobe, Film
  • “Rembrandt/Ankur Recreation”

    “Rembrandt/Ankur Recreation”

    2 of 6
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    Stock imagery is rarely talked about in a positive light. Adobe is setting out to change that. Introducing “Make a Masterpiece.” Adobe challenged four digital artists from its Behance artist community to faithfully and intricately re-create lost, stolen or destroyed art using just Adobe Stock photography inside the Creative Cloud. 

    The artists and their assigned pieces of art included Karla Cordova (Ecuador) and Frida Kahlo’s The Wounded Table; Jean-Charles Debroize (France) and Caravaggio’s Saint Matthew and the Angel; Mike Campau (US) and Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s Cathedral Towering Over a Town; and Ankur Patar (India) and Rembrandt van Rijn’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee.

    The result is four re-creations of lost masterpieces created from thousands of Adobe Stock photographs that, without a second glance, could pass for the originals. 

    The “Make a Masterpiece” experience is housed at http://www.adobestockmasterpiece.com/ and features the finished masterpieces as well as behind-the-scenes footage. Clicking on each masterpiece reveals the individual stock photos used in their creation. 

     

    Released: June 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Adobe, Film
  • “Caravaggio”

    “Caravaggio”

    3 of 6
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    Stock imagery is rarely talked about in a positive light. Adobe is setting out to change that. Introducing “Make a Masterpiece.” Adobe challenged four digital artists from its Behance artist community to faithfully and intricately re-create lost, stolen or destroyed art using just Adobe Stock photography inside the Creative Cloud. 

    The artists and their assigned pieces of art included Karla Cordova (Ecuador) and Frida Kahlo’s The Wounded Table; Jean-Charles Debroize (France) and Caravaggio’s Saint Matthew and the Angel; Mike Campau (US) and Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s Cathedral Towering Over a Town; and Ankur Patar (India) and Rembrandt van Rijn’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee.

    The result is four re-creations of lost masterpieces created from thousands of Adobe Stock photographs that, without a second glance, could pass for the originals. 

    The “Make a Masterpiece” experience is housed at http://www.adobestockmasterpiece.com/ and features the finished masterpieces as well as behind-the-scenes footage. Clicking on each masterpiece reveals the individual stock photos used in their creation. 

    Released: June 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Adobe, Film
  • “Frida”

    “Frida”

    4 of 6
    Prev Next

    Stock imagery is rarely talked about in a positive light. Adobe is setting out to change that. Introducing “Make a Masterpiece.” Adobe challenged four digital artists from its Behance artist community to faithfully and intricately re-create lost, stolen or destroyed art using just Adobe Stock photography inside the Creative Cloud. 

    The artists and their assigned pieces of art included Karla Cordova (Ecuador) and Frida Kahlo’s The Wounded Table; Jean-Charles Debroize (France) and Caravaggio’s Saint Matthew and the Angel; Mike Campau (US) and Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s Cathedral Towering Over a Town; and Ankur Patar (India) and Rembrandt van Rijn’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee.

    The result is four re-creations of lost masterpieces created from thousands of Adobe Stock photographs that, without a second glance, could pass for the originals. 

    The “Make a Masterpiece” experience is housed http://www.adobestockmasterpiece.com/ and features the finished masterpieces as well as behind-the-scenes footage. Clicking on each masterpiece reveals the individual stock photos used in their creation. 

    Released: June 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Adobe, Film
  • “Schinkel”

    “Schinkel”

    5 of 6
    Prev Next

    Stock imagery is rarely talked about in a positive light. Adobe is setting out to change that. Introducing “Make a Masterpiece.” Adobe challenged four digital artists from its Behance artist community to faithfully and intricately re-create lost, stolen or destroyed art using just Adobe Stock photography inside the Creative Cloud. 

    The artists and their assigned pieces of art included Karla Cordova (Ecuador) and Frida Kahlo’s The Wounded Table; Jean-Charles Debroize (France) and Caravaggio’s Saint Matthew and the Angel; Mike Campau (US) and Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s Cathedral Towering Over a Town; and Ankur Patar (India) and Rembrandt van Rijn’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee.

    The result is four re-creations of lost masterpieces created from thousands of Adobe Stock photographs that, without a second glance, could pass for the originals. 

    The “Make a Masterpiece” experience is housed at http://www.adobestockmasterpiece.com/ and features the finished masterpieces as well as behind-the-scenes footage. Clicking on each masterpiece reveals the individual stock photos used in their creation. 

    Released: June 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Adobe, Film
  • "Rembrandt"

    "Rembrandt"

    6 of 6
    Prev Next

    Stock imagery is rarely talked about in a positive light. Adobe is setting out to change that. Introducing “Make a Masterpiece.” Adobe challenged four digital artists from its Behance artist community to faithfully and intricately re-create lost, stolen or destroyed art using just Adobe Stock photography inside the Creative Cloud. 

    The artists and their assigned pieces of art included Karla Cordova (Ecuador) and Frida Kahlo’s The Wounded Table; Jean-Charles Debroize (France) and Caravaggio’s Saint Matthew and the Angel; Mike Campau (US) and Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s Cathedral Towering Over a Town; and Ankur Patar (India) and Rembrandt van Rijn’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee.

    The result is four re-creations of lost masterpieces created from thousands of Adobe Stock photographs that, without a second glance, could pass for the originals. The “Make a Masterpiece” experience is housed at http://www.adobestockmasterpiece.com/ and features the finished masterpieces as well as behind-the-scenes footage. Clicking on each masterpiece reveals the individual stock photos used in their creation. 

    Released: June 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Adobe, Film

Emily’s Oz

Client:
Comcast/XFINITY
  • TV Spot: “Emily’s Oz”

    Aired during the 2015 Academy Awards, a 60-second commercial called “Emily’s Oz” sparked a conversation about how people with disabilities enjoy entertainment.

    Comcast teamed up with GS&P New York to create the spot, which illustrates what a person who is blind sees in their head when they watch their favorite movie. “Emily’s Oz” brings to life The Wizard of Oz according to Emily, a seven-year-old girl who was born blind.

    Comcast and GS&P worked on the campaign with director Andreas Nilsson and some of Hollywood’s top set designers and makeup artists. The spot features a voice-over by two-time Academy Award–winner Robert Redford.

    The commercial directed viewers to EmilysOz.com, where they can watch a short documentary about Emily’s story and how her vision came to life. The site also explains the technology behind Comcast’s accessibility services.

    The talking guide that is featured in the spot is the latest in a series of innovations created in the Comcast Accessibility Lab. Comcast created, in addition to voice guidance and one-touch access to closed captioning, an online help-and-support resource for XFINITY customers looking for information about accessibility-related topics.

    “We want to create opportunities for people who love film and television but who might not have the opportunity to experience it to its fullest,” said Tom Wlodkowski, who was hired as Comcast’s vice president of audience in 2012 to focus on the usability of the company’s products and services for people with disabilities. 

    Released: February 2015

    Tags:
    Comcast/XFINITY, Film

Tall Tale Tellers

Client:
Comcast/XFINITY
  • Tall Tale Tellers

    Tall Tale Tellers

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    “The whole truth, and nothing but the truth,” is something AT&T, one of XFINITY’s biggest competitors, doesn’t always get right. So to combat some less-than-truthful statements in their most recent ads, we created a campaign that brings their fibs to light. But we didn’t want AT&T to feel singled out, so we surrounded them with like-minded people that are also known for playing fast and loose with the truth: fairy tale characters.

    This campaign features a support group of well-known fibbers as they talk through their problems. Viewers will find characters like Chicken Little, Pinocchio, and the Boy Who Cried Wolf as they react to all the different fibs.

    Released: January 2018

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Comcast/XFINITY
  • Tall Tale Tellers

    Tall Tale Tellers

    2 of 4
    Prev Next

    “The whole truth, and nothing but the truth,” is something AT&T, one of XFINITY’s biggest competitors, doesn’t always get right. So to combat some less-than-truthful statements in their most recent ads, we created a campaign that brings their fibs to light. But we didn’t want AT&T to feel singled out, so we surrounded them with like-minded people that are also known for playing fast and loose with the truth: fairy tale characters.

    This campaign features a support group of well-known fibbers as they talk through their problems. Viewers will find characters like Chicken Little, Pinocchio, and the Boy Who Cried Wolf as they react to all the different fibs.

     

    Released: January 2018

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Comcast/XFINITY
  • Tall Tale Tellers

    Tall Tale Tellers

    3 of 4
    Prev Next

    “The whole truth, and nothing but the truth,” is something AT&T, one of XFINITY’s biggest competitors, doesn’t always get right. So to combat some less-than-truthful statements in their most recent ads, we created a campaign that brings their fibs to light. But we didn’t want AT&T to feel singled out, so we surrounded them with like-minded people that are also known for playing fast and loose with the truth: fairy tale characters.

    This campaign features a support group of well-known fibbers as they talk through their problems. Viewers will find characters like Chicken Little, Pinocchio, and the Boy Who Cried Wolf as they react to all the different fibs.

    Released: January 2018

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Comcast/XFINITY
  • Tall Tale Tellers

    Tall Tale Tellers

    4 of 4
    Prev Next

    “The whole truth, and nothing but the truth,” is something AT&T, one of XFINITY’s biggest competitors, doesn’t always get right. So to combat some less-than-truthful statements in their most recent ads, we created a campaign that brings their fibs to light. But we didn’t want AT&T to feel singled out, so we surrounded them with like-minded people that are also known for playing fast and loose with the truth: fairy tale characters.

    This campaign features a support group of well-known fibbers as they talk through their problems. Viewers will find characters like Chicken Little, Pinocchio, and the Boy Who Cried Wolf as they react to all the different fibs.

    Released: January 2018

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Comcast/XFINITY

Unacceptable Acceptance Letters

Client:
The Hunting Ground
  • Reactions

    Reactions

    1 of 7
    Prev Next

    One in 5 women and 1 in 16 men will be sexually assaulted at college.

    Those are the horrifying statistics that inspired us to create the “Unacceptable Acceptance Letters” campaign, timed around the month of April, which is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and also the time when acceptance letters go out to incoming freshmen. 

    To share the stories of sexual violence survivors, we created mock acceptance letters from colleges that include details about actual assaults students should plan on being subjected to.

    The inaugural letter appeared with a print-ad buy in the Harvard Crimson timed around the college’s admitted-students weekend. A letter also ran in USA TODAY from Wagatwe Wanjuki, one of the many sexual-assault survivors who stood beside Lady Gaga as she sang the theme song to the documentary The Hunting Ground, “Til It Happens to You,” at the 2016 Oscars. 

    The online films we created capture the moment when college students open their acceptance letters. Leaning into the popular phenomena of today’s teens posting acceptance videos on social media, GS&P and directors Ben and Alex Brewer re-created the viral sensation of college-acceptance-letter videos but with a very dark twist to stress the severity of the sexual-assault epidemic. As the excited new students begin to read their letters aloud, we’re presented with facts from assaults that took place at these colleges, woven into the copy. The spots were shot on iPhones to make them as authentic as possible.

    In partnership with Ultraviolet, the campaign extended to social media, inviting people to join the movement by sharing the online films and acceptance letters using the hashtag #DontAcceptRape. The goal was to gain more signatures supporting survivors and to hold hundreds of colleges accountable for behavior that is unacceptable.

    Released: April 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, The Hunting Ground, Integrated, Social
  • Ms. Karthers

    Ms. Karthers

    2 of 7
    Prev Next

    One in 5 women and 1 in 16 men will be sexually assaulted at college.

    Those are the horrifying statistics that inspired us to create the “Unacceptable Acceptance Letters” campaign, timed around the month of April, which is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and also the time when acceptance letters go out to incoming freshmen. 

    To share the stories of sexual violence survivors, we created mock acceptance letters from colleges that include details about actual assaults students should plan on being subjected to.

    The inaugural letter appeared with a print-ad buy in the Harvard Crimson timed around the college’s admitted-students weekend. A letter also ran in USA TODAY from Wagatwe Wanjuki, one of the many sexual-assault survivors who stood beside Lady Gaga as she sang the theme song to the documentary The Hunting Ground, “Til It Happens to You,” at the 2016 Oscars. 

    The online films we created capture the moment when college students open their acceptance letters. Leaning into the popular phenomena of today’s teens posting acceptance videos on social media, GS&P and directors Ben and Alex Brewer re-created the viral sensation of college-acceptance-letter videos but with a very dark twist to stress the severity of the sexual-assault epidemic. As the excited new students begin to read their letters aloud, we’re presented with facts from assaults that took place at these colleges, woven into the copy. The spots were shot on iPhones to make them as authentic as possible.

    In partnership with Ultraviolet, the campaign extended to social media, inviting people to join the movement by sharing the online films and acceptance letters using the hashtag #DontAcceptRape. The goal was to gain more signatures supporting survivors and to hold hundreds of colleges accountable for behavior that is unacceptable.

    Released: April 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, The Hunting Ground, Integrated, Social
  • Ms. Roberts

    Ms. Roberts

    3 of 7
    Prev Next

    One in 5 women and 1 in 16 men will be sexually assaulted at college.

    Those are the horrifying statistics that inspired us to create the “Unacceptable Acceptance Letters” campaign, timed around the month of April, which is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and also the time when acceptance letters go out to incoming freshmen. 

    To share the stories of sexual violence survivors, we created mock acceptance letters from colleges that include details about actual assaults students should plan on being subjected to.

    The inaugural letter appeared with a print-ad buy in the Harvard Crimson timed around the college’s admitted-students weekend. A letter also ran in USA TODAY from Wagatwe Wanjuki, one of the many sexual-assault survivors who stood beside Lady Gaga as she sang the theme song to the documentary The Hunting Ground, “Til It Happens to You,” at the 2016 Oscars. 

    The online films we created capture the moment when college students open their acceptance letters. Leaning into the popular phenomena of today’s teens posting acceptance videos on social media, GS&P and directors Ben and Alex Brewer re-created the viral sensation of college-acceptance-letter videos but with a very dark twist to stress the severity of the sexual-assault epidemic. As the excited new students begin to read their letters aloud, we’re presented with facts from assaults that took place at these colleges, woven into the copy. The spots were shot on iPhones to make them as authentic as possible.

    In partnership with Ultraviolet, the campaign extended to social media, inviting people to join the movement by sharing the online films and acceptance letters using the hashtag #DontAcceptRape. The goal was to gain more signatures supporting survivors and to hold hundreds of colleges accountable for behavior that is unacceptable.

    Released: April 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, The Hunting Ground, Integrated, Social
  • Mr. Phillips

    Mr. Phillips

    4 of 7
    Prev Next

    One in 5 women and 1 in 16 men will be sexually assaulted at college.

    Those are the horrifying statistics that inspired us to create the “Unacceptable Acceptance Letters” campaign, timed around the month of April, which is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and also the time when acceptance letters go out to incoming freshmen. 

    To share the stories of sexual violence survivors, we created mock acceptance letters from colleges that include details about actual assaults students should plan on being subjected to.

    The inaugural letter appeared with a print-ad buy in the Harvard Crimson timed around the college’s admitted-students weekend. A letter also ran in USA TODAY from Wagatwe Wanjuki, one of the many sexual-assault survivors who stood beside Lady Gaga as she sang the theme song to the documentary The Hunting Ground, “Til It Happens to You,” at the 2016 Oscars. 

    The online films we created capture the moment when college students open their acceptance letters. Leaning into the popular phenomena of today’s teens posting acceptance videos on social media, GS&P and directors Ben and Alex Brewer re-created the viral sensation of college-acceptance-letter videos but with a very dark twist to stress the severity of the sexual-assault epidemic. As the excited new students begin to read their letters aloud, we’re presented with facts from assaults that took place at these colleges, woven into the copy. The spots were shot on iPhones to make them as authentic as possible.

    In partnership with Ultraviolet, the campaign extended to social media, inviting people to join the movement by sharing the online films and acceptance letters using the hashtag #DontAcceptRape. The goal was to gain more signatures supporting survivors and to hold hundreds of colleges accountable for behavior that is unacceptable.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Released: April 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, The Hunting Ground, Integrated, Social
  • Ms. Archer

    Ms. Archer

    5 of 7
    Prev Next

    One in 5 women and 1 in 16 men will be sexually assaulted at college.

    Those are the horrifying statistics that inspired us to create the “Unacceptable Acceptance Letters” campaign, timed around the month of April, which is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and also the time when acceptance letters go out to incoming freshmen. 

    To share the stories of sexual violence survivors, we created mock acceptance letters from colleges that include details about actual assaults students should plan on being subjected to.

    The inaugural letter appeared with a print-ad buy in the Harvard Crimson timed around the college’s admitted-students weekend. A letter also ran in USA TODAY from Wagatwe Wanjuki, one of the many sexual-assault survivors who stood beside Lady Gaga as she sang the theme song to the documentary The Hunting Ground, “Til It Happens to You,” at the 2016 Oscars. 

    The online films we created capture the moment when college students open their acceptance letters. Leaning into the popular phenomena of today’s teens posting acceptance videos on social media, GS&P and directors Ben and Alex Brewer re-created the viral sensation of college-acceptance-letter videos but with a very dark twist to stress the severity of the sexual-assault epidemic. As the excited new students begin to read their letters aloud, we’re presented with facts from assaults that took place at these colleges, woven into the copy. The spots were shot on iPhones to make them as authentic as possible.

    In partnership with Ultraviolet, the campaign extended to social media, inviting people to join the movement by sharing the online films and acceptance letters using the hashtag #DontAcceptRape. The goal was to gain more signatures supporting survivors and to hold hundreds of colleges accountable for behavior that is unacceptable.

    Released: April 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, The Hunting Ground, Integrated, Social
  • Mr. Poulten

    Mr. Poulten

    6 of 7
    Prev Next

    One in 5 women and 1 in 16 men will be sexually assaulted at college.

    Those are the horrifying statistics that inspired us to create the “Unacceptable Acceptance Letters” campaign, timed around the month of April, which is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and also the time when acceptance letters go out to incoming freshmen. 

    To share the stories of sexual violence survivors, we created mock acceptance letters from colleges that include details about actual assaults students should plan on being subjected to.

    The inaugural letter appeared with a print-ad buy in the Harvard Crimson timed around the college’s admitted-students weekend. A letter also ran in USA TODAY from Wagatwe Wanjuki, one of the many sexual-assault survivors who stood beside Lady Gaga as she sang the theme song to the documentary The Hunting Ground, “Til It Happens to You,” at the 2016 Oscars. 

    The online films we created capture the moment when college students open their acceptance letters. Leaning into the popular phenomena of today’s teens posting acceptance videos on social media, GS&P and directors Ben and Alex Brewer re-created the viral sensation of college-acceptance-letter videos but with a very dark twist to stress the severity of the sexual-assault epidemic. As the excited new students begin to read their letters aloud, we’re presented with facts from assaults that took place at these colleges, woven into the copy. The spots were shot on iPhones to make them as authentic as possible.

    In partnership with Ultraviolet, the campaign extended to social media, inviting people to join the movement by sharing the online films and acceptance letters using the hashtag #DontAcceptRape. The goal was to gain more signatures supporting survivors and to hold hundreds of colleges accountable for behavior that is unacceptable.

    Released: April 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, The Hunting Ground, Integrated, Social
  • Ms. Wilkinson

    Ms. Wilkinson

    7 of 7
    Prev Next

    One in 5 women and 1 in 16 men will be sexually assaulted at college.

    Those are the horrifying statistics that inspired us to create the “Unacceptable Acceptance Letters” campaign, timed around the month of April, which is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and also the time when acceptance letters go out to incoming freshmen. 

    To share the stories of sexual violence survivors, we created mock acceptance letters from colleges that include details about actual assaults students should plan on being subjected to.

    The inaugural letter appeared with a print-ad buy in the Harvard Crimson timed around the college’s admitted-students weekend. A letter also ran in USA TODAY from Wagatwe Wanjuki, one of the many sexual-assault survivors who stood beside Lady Gaga as she sang the theme song to the documentary The Hunting Ground, “Til It Happens to You,” at the 2016 Oscars. 

    The online films we created capture the moment when college students open their acceptance letters. Leaning into the popular phenomena of today’s teens posting acceptance videos on social media, GS&P and directors Ben and Alex Brewer re-created the viral sensation of college-acceptance-letter videos but with a very dark twist to stress the severity of the sexual-assault epidemic. As the excited new students begin to read their letters aloud, we’re presented with facts from assaults that took place at these colleges, woven into the copy. The spots were shot on iPhones to make them as authentic as possible.

    In partnership with Ultraviolet, the campaign extended to social media, inviting people to join the movement by sharing the online films and acceptance letters using the hashtag #DontAcceptRape. The goal was to gain more signatures supporting survivors and to hold hundreds of colleges accountable for behavior that is unacceptable.

    Released: April 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, The Hunting Ground, Integrated, Social