Make a Masterpiece

Client:
Adobe
  • Make a Masterpiece

    Make a Masterpiece

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    Stock imagery is rarely talked about in a positive light. Adobe is setting out to change that. Introducing “Make a Masterpiece.” Adobe challenged four digital artists from its Behance artist community to faithfully and intricately re-create lost, stolen or destroyed art using just Adobe Stock photography inside the Creative Cloud. 

    The artists and their assigned pieces of art included Karla Cordova (Ecuador) and Frida Kahlo’s The Wounded Table; Jean-Charles Debroize (France) and Caravaggio’s Saint Matthew and the Angel; Mike Campau (US) and Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s Cathedral Towering Over a Town; and Ankur Patar (India) and Rembrandt van Rijn’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee.

    The result is four re-creations of lost masterpieces created from thousands of Adobe Stock photographs that, without a second glance, could pass for the originals. 

    The “Make a Masterpiece” experience is housed at http://www.adobestockmasterpiece.com/ and features the finished masterpieces as well as behind-the-scenes footage. Clicking on each masterpiece reveals the individual stock photos used in their creation. 

     

    Released: June 2017

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Adobe, Film
  • “Rembrandt/Ankur Recreation”

    “Rembrandt/Ankur Recreation”

    2 of 6
    Prev Next

    Stock imagery is rarely talked about in a positive light. Adobe is setting out to change that. Introducing “Make a Masterpiece.” Adobe challenged four digital artists from its Behance artist community to faithfully and intricately re-create lost, stolen or destroyed art using just Adobe Stock photography inside the Creative Cloud. 

    The artists and their assigned pieces of art included Karla Cordova (Ecuador) and Frida Kahlo’s The Wounded Table; Jean-Charles Debroize (France) and Caravaggio’s Saint Matthew and the Angel; Mike Campau (US) and Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s Cathedral Towering Over a Town; and Ankur Patar (India) and Rembrandt van Rijn’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee.

    The result is four re-creations of lost masterpieces created from thousands of Adobe Stock photographs that, without a second glance, could pass for the originals. 

    The “Make a Masterpiece” experience is housed at http://www.adobestockmasterpiece.com/ and features the finished masterpieces as well as behind-the-scenes footage. Clicking on each masterpiece reveals the individual stock photos used in their creation. 

     

    Released: June 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Adobe, Film
  • “Caravaggio”

    “Caravaggio”

    3 of 6
    Prev Next

    Stock imagery is rarely talked about in a positive light. Adobe is setting out to change that. Introducing “Make a Masterpiece.” Adobe challenged four digital artists from its Behance artist community to faithfully and intricately re-create lost, stolen or destroyed art using just Adobe Stock photography inside the Creative Cloud. 

    The artists and their assigned pieces of art included Karla Cordova (Ecuador) and Frida Kahlo’s The Wounded Table; Jean-Charles Debroize (France) and Caravaggio’s Saint Matthew and the Angel; Mike Campau (US) and Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s Cathedral Towering Over a Town; and Ankur Patar (India) and Rembrandt van Rijn’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee.

    The result is four re-creations of lost masterpieces created from thousands of Adobe Stock photographs that, without a second glance, could pass for the originals. 

    The “Make a Masterpiece” experience is housed at http://www.adobestockmasterpiece.com/ and features the finished masterpieces as well as behind-the-scenes footage. Clicking on each masterpiece reveals the individual stock photos used in their creation. 

    Released: June 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Adobe, Film
  • “Frida”

    “Frida”

    4 of 6
    Prev Next

    Stock imagery is rarely talked about in a positive light. Adobe is setting out to change that. Introducing “Make a Masterpiece.” Adobe challenged four digital artists from its Behance artist community to faithfully and intricately re-create lost, stolen or destroyed art using just Adobe Stock photography inside the Creative Cloud. 

    The artists and their assigned pieces of art included Karla Cordova (Ecuador) and Frida Kahlo’s The Wounded Table; Jean-Charles Debroize (France) and Caravaggio’s Saint Matthew and the Angel; Mike Campau (US) and Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s Cathedral Towering Over a Town; and Ankur Patar (India) and Rembrandt van Rijn’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee.

    The result is four re-creations of lost masterpieces created from thousands of Adobe Stock photographs that, without a second glance, could pass for the originals. 

    The “Make a Masterpiece” experience is housed http://www.adobestockmasterpiece.com/ and features the finished masterpieces as well as behind-the-scenes footage. Clicking on each masterpiece reveals the individual stock photos used in their creation. 

    Released: June 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Adobe, Film
  • “Schinkel”

    “Schinkel”

    5 of 6
    Prev Next

    Stock imagery is rarely talked about in a positive light. Adobe is setting out to change that. Introducing “Make a Masterpiece.” Adobe challenged four digital artists from its Behance artist community to faithfully and intricately re-create lost, stolen or destroyed art using just Adobe Stock photography inside the Creative Cloud. 

    The artists and their assigned pieces of art included Karla Cordova (Ecuador) and Frida Kahlo’s The Wounded Table; Jean-Charles Debroize (France) and Caravaggio’s Saint Matthew and the Angel; Mike Campau (US) and Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s Cathedral Towering Over a Town; and Ankur Patar (India) and Rembrandt van Rijn’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee.

    The result is four re-creations of lost masterpieces created from thousands of Adobe Stock photographs that, without a second glance, could pass for the originals. 

    The “Make a Masterpiece” experience is housed at http://www.adobestockmasterpiece.com/ and features the finished masterpieces as well as behind-the-scenes footage. Clicking on each masterpiece reveals the individual stock photos used in their creation. 

    Released: June 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Adobe, Film
  • "Rembrandt"

    "Rembrandt"

    6 of 6
    Prev Next

    Stock imagery is rarely talked about in a positive light. Adobe is setting out to change that. Introducing “Make a Masterpiece.” Adobe challenged four digital artists from its Behance artist community to faithfully and intricately re-create lost, stolen or destroyed art using just Adobe Stock photography inside the Creative Cloud. 

    The artists and their assigned pieces of art included Karla Cordova (Ecuador) and Frida Kahlo’s The Wounded Table; Jean-Charles Debroize (France) and Caravaggio’s Saint Matthew and the Angel; Mike Campau (US) and Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s Cathedral Towering Over a Town; and Ankur Patar (India) and Rembrandt van Rijn’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee.

    The result is four re-creations of lost masterpieces created from thousands of Adobe Stock photographs that, without a second glance, could pass for the originals. The “Make a Masterpiece” experience is housed at http://www.adobestockmasterpiece.com/ and features the finished masterpieces as well as behind-the-scenes footage. Clicking on each masterpiece reveals the individual stock photos used in their creation. 

    Released: June 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Adobe, Film

#SquareShakes

Client:
SONIC Drive-In
  • SONIC #SquareShakes

    People are obsessed with capturing the world on Instagram, so we thought, “What if we manipulated the real world to fit it on Instagram?”

    GS&P launched a partnership with SONIC and Instagram celebrity @ChefJacquesLaMerde to introduce the world’s first product designed especially for Instagram: SONIC #SquareShakes. The SONIC Square Shake was entirely square, perfect for photographing and sharing, complete with a square cup and a square straw. 

    The shakes were available exclusively through “Shop Now” sponsored ads on Instagram for 2016 Coachella festivalgoers at the Base Camp festival grounds. Through the geotargeted ads, attendees could order the shakes and sample them on the spot—a first-of-its-kind program for Instagram. Samplers were then encouraged to share their Square Shakes on Instagram with the hashtag #SquareShakes, thus completing the Insta-circle.

    Released: April 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, SONIC Drive-In, Mobile, Social

Dreams of Dalí

Client:
The Dalí Museum
  • Dreams of Dalí

    When a piece of artwork really inspires you, sometimes you just want to jump inside it and wander around. And now you can. 

    “Dreams of Dalí” takes us inside the mind of the legendary surrealist Salvador Dalí by transporting us into one of his early paintings, Archeological Reminiscence of Millet’s “Angelus” (1935). Just put on the virtual-reality headset, and you’ll be able to move around inside the painting in a fully immersive 3-D environment. You’ll look beyond what was depicted in the original frame and even hear Dali’s possible thoughts as he was imagining his surreal world. 

    “We are excited that our partnership with the Dalí Museum has allowed us an opportunity to explore a new way to look at art,” remarked GS&P co-founder Jeff Goodby. “Dalí was a true visionary, and no other artist would be a better fit for this project.”

    “Dreams of Dalí” will be open to the public at the Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida. A 360-degree-video version of the experience, involving simpler VR gadgets like Google Cardboard or Samsung Gear VR, is also available at dreamsofdali.org. 

    Released: January 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, The Dalí Museum, Interactive, Film, Integrated, Mobile, Experiential

Unacceptable Acceptance Letters

Client:
The Hunting Ground
  • Reactions

    Reactions

    1 of 7
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    One in 5 women and 1 in 16 men will be sexually assaulted at college.

    Those are the horrifying statistics that inspired us to create the “Unacceptable Acceptance Letters” campaign, timed around the month of April, which is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and also the time when acceptance letters go out to incoming freshmen. 

    To share the stories of sexual violence survivors, we created mock acceptance letters from colleges that include details about actual assaults students should plan on being subjected to.

    The inaugural letter appeared with a print-ad buy in the Harvard Crimson timed around the college’s admitted-students weekend. A letter also ran in USA TODAY from Wagatwe Wanjuki, one of the many sexual-assault survivors who stood beside Lady Gaga as she sang the theme song to the documentary The Hunting Ground, “Til It Happens to You,” at the 2016 Oscars. 

    The online films we created capture the moment when college students open their acceptance letters. Leaning into the popular phenomena of today’s teens posting acceptance videos on social media, GS&P and directors Ben and Alex Brewer re-created the viral sensation of college-acceptance-letter videos but with a very dark twist to stress the severity of the sexual-assault epidemic. As the excited new students begin to read their letters aloud, we’re presented with facts from assaults that took place at these colleges, woven into the copy. The spots were shot on iPhones to make them as authentic as possible.

    In partnership with Ultraviolet, the campaign extended to social media, inviting people to join the movement by sharing the online films and acceptance letters using the hashtag #DontAcceptRape. The goal was to gain more signatures supporting survivors and to hold hundreds of colleges accountable for behavior that is unacceptable.

    Released: April 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, The Hunting Ground, Integrated, Social
  • Ms. Karthers

    Ms. Karthers

    2 of 7
    Prev Next

    One in 5 women and 1 in 16 men will be sexually assaulted at college.

    Those are the horrifying statistics that inspired us to create the “Unacceptable Acceptance Letters” campaign, timed around the month of April, which is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and also the time when acceptance letters go out to incoming freshmen. 

    To share the stories of sexual violence survivors, we created mock acceptance letters from colleges that include details about actual assaults students should plan on being subjected to.

    The inaugural letter appeared with a print-ad buy in the Harvard Crimson timed around the college’s admitted-students weekend. A letter also ran in USA TODAY from Wagatwe Wanjuki, one of the many sexual-assault survivors who stood beside Lady Gaga as she sang the theme song to the documentary The Hunting Ground, “Til It Happens to You,” at the 2016 Oscars. 

    The online films we created capture the moment when college students open their acceptance letters. Leaning into the popular phenomena of today’s teens posting acceptance videos on social media, GS&P and directors Ben and Alex Brewer re-created the viral sensation of college-acceptance-letter videos but with a very dark twist to stress the severity of the sexual-assault epidemic. As the excited new students begin to read their letters aloud, we’re presented with facts from assaults that took place at these colleges, woven into the copy. The spots were shot on iPhones to make them as authentic as possible.

    In partnership with Ultraviolet, the campaign extended to social media, inviting people to join the movement by sharing the online films and acceptance letters using the hashtag #DontAcceptRape. The goal was to gain more signatures supporting survivors and to hold hundreds of colleges accountable for behavior that is unacceptable.

    Released: April 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, The Hunting Ground, Integrated, Social
  • Ms. Roberts

    Ms. Roberts

    3 of 7
    Prev Next

    One in 5 women and 1 in 16 men will be sexually assaulted at college.

    Those are the horrifying statistics that inspired us to create the “Unacceptable Acceptance Letters” campaign, timed around the month of April, which is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and also the time when acceptance letters go out to incoming freshmen. 

    To share the stories of sexual violence survivors, we created mock acceptance letters from colleges that include details about actual assaults students should plan on being subjected to.

    The inaugural letter appeared with a print-ad buy in the Harvard Crimson timed around the college’s admitted-students weekend. A letter also ran in USA TODAY from Wagatwe Wanjuki, one of the many sexual-assault survivors who stood beside Lady Gaga as she sang the theme song to the documentary The Hunting Ground, “Til It Happens to You,” at the 2016 Oscars. 

    The online films we created capture the moment when college students open their acceptance letters. Leaning into the popular phenomena of today’s teens posting acceptance videos on social media, GS&P and directors Ben and Alex Brewer re-created the viral sensation of college-acceptance-letter videos but with a very dark twist to stress the severity of the sexual-assault epidemic. As the excited new students begin to read their letters aloud, we’re presented with facts from assaults that took place at these colleges, woven into the copy. The spots were shot on iPhones to make them as authentic as possible.

    In partnership with Ultraviolet, the campaign extended to social media, inviting people to join the movement by sharing the online films and acceptance letters using the hashtag #DontAcceptRape. The goal was to gain more signatures supporting survivors and to hold hundreds of colleges accountable for behavior that is unacceptable.

    Released: April 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, The Hunting Ground, Integrated, Social
  • Mr. Phillips

    Mr. Phillips

    4 of 7
    Prev Next

    One in 5 women and 1 in 16 men will be sexually assaulted at college.

    Those are the horrifying statistics that inspired us to create the “Unacceptable Acceptance Letters” campaign, timed around the month of April, which is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and also the time when acceptance letters go out to incoming freshmen. 

    To share the stories of sexual violence survivors, we created mock acceptance letters from colleges that include details about actual assaults students should plan on being subjected to.

    The inaugural letter appeared with a print-ad buy in the Harvard Crimson timed around the college’s admitted-students weekend. A letter also ran in USA TODAY from Wagatwe Wanjuki, one of the many sexual-assault survivors who stood beside Lady Gaga as she sang the theme song to the documentary The Hunting Ground, “Til It Happens to You,” at the 2016 Oscars. 

    The online films we created capture the moment when college students open their acceptance letters. Leaning into the popular phenomena of today’s teens posting acceptance videos on social media, GS&P and directors Ben and Alex Brewer re-created the viral sensation of college-acceptance-letter videos but with a very dark twist to stress the severity of the sexual-assault epidemic. As the excited new students begin to read their letters aloud, we’re presented with facts from assaults that took place at these colleges, woven into the copy. The spots were shot on iPhones to make them as authentic as possible.

    In partnership with Ultraviolet, the campaign extended to social media, inviting people to join the movement by sharing the online films and acceptance letters using the hashtag #DontAcceptRape. The goal was to gain more signatures supporting survivors and to hold hundreds of colleges accountable for behavior that is unacceptable.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Released: April 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, The Hunting Ground, Integrated, Social
  • Ms. Archer

    Ms. Archer

    5 of 7
    Prev Next

    One in 5 women and 1 in 16 men will be sexually assaulted at college.

    Those are the horrifying statistics that inspired us to create the “Unacceptable Acceptance Letters” campaign, timed around the month of April, which is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and also the time when acceptance letters go out to incoming freshmen. 

    To share the stories of sexual violence survivors, we created mock acceptance letters from colleges that include details about actual assaults students should plan on being subjected to.

    The inaugural letter appeared with a print-ad buy in the Harvard Crimson timed around the college’s admitted-students weekend. A letter also ran in USA TODAY from Wagatwe Wanjuki, one of the many sexual-assault survivors who stood beside Lady Gaga as she sang the theme song to the documentary The Hunting Ground, “Til It Happens to You,” at the 2016 Oscars. 

    The online films we created capture the moment when college students open their acceptance letters. Leaning into the popular phenomena of today’s teens posting acceptance videos on social media, GS&P and directors Ben and Alex Brewer re-created the viral sensation of college-acceptance-letter videos but with a very dark twist to stress the severity of the sexual-assault epidemic. As the excited new students begin to read their letters aloud, we’re presented with facts from assaults that took place at these colleges, woven into the copy. The spots were shot on iPhones to make them as authentic as possible.

    In partnership with Ultraviolet, the campaign extended to social media, inviting people to join the movement by sharing the online films and acceptance letters using the hashtag #DontAcceptRape. The goal was to gain more signatures supporting survivors and to hold hundreds of colleges accountable for behavior that is unacceptable.

    Released: April 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, The Hunting Ground, Integrated, Social
  • Mr. Poulten

    Mr. Poulten

    6 of 7
    Prev Next

    One in 5 women and 1 in 16 men will be sexually assaulted at college.

    Those are the horrifying statistics that inspired us to create the “Unacceptable Acceptance Letters” campaign, timed around the month of April, which is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and also the time when acceptance letters go out to incoming freshmen. 

    To share the stories of sexual violence survivors, we created mock acceptance letters from colleges that include details about actual assaults students should plan on being subjected to.

    The inaugural letter appeared with a print-ad buy in the Harvard Crimson timed around the college’s admitted-students weekend. A letter also ran in USA TODAY from Wagatwe Wanjuki, one of the many sexual-assault survivors who stood beside Lady Gaga as she sang the theme song to the documentary The Hunting Ground, “Til It Happens to You,” at the 2016 Oscars. 

    The online films we created capture the moment when college students open their acceptance letters. Leaning into the popular phenomena of today’s teens posting acceptance videos on social media, GS&P and directors Ben and Alex Brewer re-created the viral sensation of college-acceptance-letter videos but with a very dark twist to stress the severity of the sexual-assault epidemic. As the excited new students begin to read their letters aloud, we’re presented with facts from assaults that took place at these colleges, woven into the copy. The spots were shot on iPhones to make them as authentic as possible.

    In partnership with Ultraviolet, the campaign extended to social media, inviting people to join the movement by sharing the online films and acceptance letters using the hashtag #DontAcceptRape. The goal was to gain more signatures supporting survivors and to hold hundreds of colleges accountable for behavior that is unacceptable.

    Released: April 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, The Hunting Ground, Integrated, Social
  • Ms. Wilkinson

    Ms. Wilkinson

    7 of 7
    Prev Next

    One in 5 women and 1 in 16 men will be sexually assaulted at college.

    Those are the horrifying statistics that inspired us to create the “Unacceptable Acceptance Letters” campaign, timed around the month of April, which is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and also the time when acceptance letters go out to incoming freshmen. 

    To share the stories of sexual violence survivors, we created mock acceptance letters from colleges that include details about actual assaults students should plan on being subjected to.

    The inaugural letter appeared with a print-ad buy in the Harvard Crimson timed around the college’s admitted-students weekend. A letter also ran in USA TODAY from Wagatwe Wanjuki, one of the many sexual-assault survivors who stood beside Lady Gaga as she sang the theme song to the documentary The Hunting Ground, “Til It Happens to You,” at the 2016 Oscars. 

    The online films we created capture the moment when college students open their acceptance letters. Leaning into the popular phenomena of today’s teens posting acceptance videos on social media, GS&P and directors Ben and Alex Brewer re-created the viral sensation of college-acceptance-letter videos but with a very dark twist to stress the severity of the sexual-assault epidemic. As the excited new students begin to read their letters aloud, we’re presented with facts from assaults that took place at these colleges, woven into the copy. The spots were shot on iPhones to make them as authentic as possible.

    In partnership with Ultraviolet, the campaign extended to social media, inviting people to join the movement by sharing the online films and acceptance letters using the hashtag #DontAcceptRape. The goal was to gain more signatures supporting survivors and to hold hundreds of colleges accountable for behavior that is unacceptable.

    Released: April 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, The Hunting Ground, Integrated, Social