Poverty Line Prices

Client:
Tipping Point Community
  • Poverty Line Prices

    Poverty Line Prices

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    Imagine walking into a grocery store where every item is five times more expensive than it usually is. A store where milk is $24 and a monthly bus pass costs $365.

    That’s the unfortunate reality that the one in ten Bay Area families (788,000 individuals) living below the poverty line experiences every day. In large part due to high-paying jobs in Silicon Valley, the Bay Area’s median household income is $153,057—which, after taxes, is five times more than the earnings of those families living below the poverty line ($24,300). To raise awareness of this pay gap, we partnered with the Tipping Point to simulate the struggle of living below the poverty line.

    GS&P introduced “Poverty Line Prices” with a provocative film. We placed undercover cameras in a high-end San Francisco (Nob Hill) grocery store and filmed people’s reactions as they were charged prices five times higher than the real cost. 

    “The Bay Area is a tale of two cities: the haves and the have-nots,” said Rich Silverstein, co-chairman and partner at GS&P. “We wanted people to get a small sense of the reality of living below the poverty line so that they truly understand the importance of Tipping Point’s mission.” 

    We also created a coupon insert that features items with prices inflated by 500 percent. It will run in the San Francisco Chronicle on the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. The insert serves as a stark contrast to the Black Friday blockbuster discounts that typically appear in the issue. The campaign will drive to a mobile-first website, tippingpoint.org, that enables people to plug in their income to determine how expensive basic items seem for those living below the poverty line. On social networks, people are encouraged to share the campaign using the hashtag #PovertyLinePrices. 

    Released: November 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Tipping Point Community
  • Poverty Line Prices

    2 of 4
    Prev Next

    Imagine walking into a grocery store where every item is five times more expensive than it usually is. A store where milk is $24 and a monthly bus pass costs $365.

    That’s the unfortunate reality that the one in ten Bay Area families (788,000 individuals) living below the poverty line experiences every day. In large part due to high-paying jobs in Silicon Valley, the Bay Area’s median household income is $153,057—which, after taxes, is five times more than the earnings of those families living below the poverty line ($24,300). To raise awareness of this pay gap, we partnered with the Tipping Point to simulate the struggle of living below the poverty line.

    GS&P introduced “Poverty Line Prices” with a provocative film. We placed undercover cameras in a high-end San Francisco (Nob Hill) grocery store and filmed people’s reactions as they were charged prices five times higher than the real cost. 

    “The Bay Area is a tale of two cities: the haves and the have-nots,” said Rich Silverstein, co-chairman and partner at GS&P. “We wanted people to get a small sense of the reality of living below the poverty line so that they truly understand the importance of Tipping Point’s mission.” 

    We also created a coupon insert that features items with prices inflated by 500 percent. It will run in the San Francisco Chronicle on the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. The insert serves as a stark contrast to the Black Friday blockbuster discounts that typically appear in the issue. The campaign will drive to a mobile-first website, tippingpoint.org, that enables people to plug in their income to determine how expensive basic items seem for those living below the poverty line. On social networks, people are encouraged to share the campaign using the hashtag #PovertyLinePrices. 

    Released: November 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Tipping Point Community
  • Poverty Line Prices

    3 of 4
    Prev Next

    Imagine walking into a grocery store where every item is five times more expensive than it usually is. A store where milk is $24 and a monthly bus pass costs $365.

    That’s the unfortunate reality that the one in ten Bay Area families (788,000 individuals) living below the poverty line experiences every day. In large part due to high-paying jobs in Silicon Valley, the Bay Area’s median household income is $153,057—which, after taxes, is five times more than the earnings of those families living below the poverty line ($24,300). To raise awareness of this pay gap, we partnered with the Tipping Point to simulate the struggle of living below the poverty line.

    GS&P introduced “Poverty Line Prices” with a provocative film. We placed undercover cameras in a high-end San Francisco (Nob Hill) grocery store and filmed people’s reactions as they were charged prices five times higher than the real cost. 

    “The Bay Area is a tale of two cities: the haves and the have-nots,” said Rich Silverstein, co-chairman and partner at GS&P. “We wanted people to get a small sense of the reality of living below the poverty line so that they truly understand the importance of Tipping Point’s mission.” 

    We also created a coupon insert that features items with prices inflated by 500 percent. It will run in the San Francisco Chronicle on the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. The insert serves as a stark contrast to the Black Friday blockbuster discounts that typically appear in the issue. The campaign will drive to a mobile-first website, tippingpoint.org, that enables people to plug in their income to determine how expensive basic items seem for those living below the poverty line. On social networks, people are encouraged to share the campaign using the hashtag #PovertyLinePrices. 

    Released: November 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Tipping Point Community
  • Poverty Line Prices

    4 of 4
    Prev Next

    Imagine walking into a grocery store where every item is five times more expensive than it usually is. A store where milk is $24 and a monthly bus pass costs $365.

    That’s the unfortunate reality that the one in ten Bay Area families (788,000 individuals) living below the poverty line experiences every day. In large part due to high-paying jobs in Silicon Valley, the Bay Area’s median household income is $153,057—which, after taxes, is five times more than the earnings of those families living below the poverty line ($24,300). To raise awareness of this pay gap, we partnered with the Tipping Point to simulate the struggle of living below the poverty line.

    GS&P introduced “Poverty Line Prices” with a provocative film. We placed undercover cameras in a high-end San Francisco (Nob Hill) grocery store and filmed people’s reactions as they were charged prices five times higher than the real cost. 

    “The Bay Area is a tale of two cities: the haves and the have-nots,” said Rich Silverstein, co-chairman and partner at GS&P. “We wanted people to get a small sense of the reality of living below the poverty line so that they truly understand the importance of Tipping Point’s mission.” 

    We also created a coupon insert that features items with prices inflated by 500 percent. It will run in the San Francisco Chronicle on the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. The insert serves as a stark contrast to the Black Friday blockbuster discounts that typically appear in the issue. The campaign will drive to a mobile-first website, tippingpoint.org, that enables people to plug in their income to determine how expensive basic items seem for those living below the poverty line. On social networks, people are encouraged to share the campaign using the hashtag #PovertyLinePrices. 

    Released: November 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Tipping Point Community

Make a Masterpiece

Client:
Adobe
  • “Rembrandt/Ankur Recreation”

    “Rembrandt/Ankur Recreation”

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    Stock imagery is rarely talked about in a positive light. Adobe is setting out to change that. Introducing “Make a Masterpiece.” Adobe challenged four digital artists from its Behance artist community to faithfully and intricately re-create lost, stolen or destroyed art using just Adobe Stock photography inside the Creative Cloud. 

    The artists and their assigned pieces of art included Karla Cordova (Ecuador) and Frida Kahlo’s The Wounded Table; Jean-Charles Debroize (France) and Caravaggio’s Saint Matthew and the Angel; Mike Campau (US) and Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s Cathedral Towering Over a Town; and Ankur Patar (India) and Rembrandt van Rijn’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee.

    The result is four re-creations of lost masterpieces created from thousands of Adobe Stock photographs that, without a second glance, could pass for the originals. 

    The “Make a Masterpiece” experience is housed at http://www.adobestockmasterpiece.com/ and features the finished masterpieces as well as behind-the-scenes footage. Clicking on each masterpiece reveals the individual stock photos used in their creation. 

     

    Released: June 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Adobe, Film
  • “Caravaggio”

    “Caravaggio”

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    Prev Next

    Stock imagery is rarely talked about in a positive light. Adobe is setting out to change that. Introducing “Make a Masterpiece.” Adobe challenged four digital artists from its Behance artist community to faithfully and intricately re-create lost, stolen or destroyed art using just Adobe Stock photography inside the Creative Cloud. 

    The artists and their assigned pieces of art included Karla Cordova (Ecuador) and Frida Kahlo’s The Wounded Table; Jean-Charles Debroize (France) and Caravaggio’s Saint Matthew and the Angel; Mike Campau (US) and Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s Cathedral Towering Over a Town; and Ankur Patar (India) and Rembrandt van Rijn’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee.

    The result is four re-creations of lost masterpieces created from thousands of Adobe Stock photographs that, without a second glance, could pass for the originals. 

    The “Make a Masterpiece” experience is housed at http://www.adobestockmasterpiece.com/ and features the finished masterpieces as well as behind-the-scenes footage. Clicking on each masterpiece reveals the individual stock photos used in their creation. 

    Released: June 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Adobe, Film
  • “Frida”

    “Frida”

    3 of 5
    Prev Next

    Stock imagery is rarely talked about in a positive light. Adobe is setting out to change that. Introducing “Make a Masterpiece.” Adobe challenged four digital artists from its Behance artist community to faithfully and intricately re-create lost, stolen or destroyed art using just Adobe Stock photography inside the Creative Cloud. 

    The artists and their assigned pieces of art included Karla Cordova (Ecuador) and Frida Kahlo’s The Wounded Table; Jean-Charles Debroize (France) and Caravaggio’s Saint Matthew and the Angel; Mike Campau (US) and Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s Cathedral Towering Over a Town; and Ankur Patar (India) and Rembrandt van Rijn’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee.

    The result is four re-creations of lost masterpieces created from thousands of Adobe Stock photographs that, without a second glance, could pass for the originals. 

    The “Make a Masterpiece” experience is housed http://www.adobestockmasterpiece.com/ and features the finished masterpieces as well as behind-the-scenes footage. Clicking on each masterpiece reveals the individual stock photos used in their creation. 

    Released: June 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Adobe, Film
  • “Schinkel”

    “Schinkel”

    4 of 5
    Prev Next

    Stock imagery is rarely talked about in a positive light. Adobe is setting out to change that. Introducing “Make a Masterpiece.” Adobe challenged four digital artists from its Behance artist community to faithfully and intricately re-create lost, stolen or destroyed art using just Adobe Stock photography inside the Creative Cloud. 

    The artists and their assigned pieces of art included Karla Cordova (Ecuador) and Frida Kahlo’s The Wounded Table; Jean-Charles Debroize (France) and Caravaggio’s Saint Matthew and the Angel; Mike Campau (US) and Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s Cathedral Towering Over a Town; and Ankur Patar (India) and Rembrandt van Rijn’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee.

    The result is four re-creations of lost masterpieces created from thousands of Adobe Stock photographs that, without a second glance, could pass for the originals. 

    The “Make a Masterpiece” experience is housed at http://www.adobestockmasterpiece.com/ and features the finished masterpieces as well as behind-the-scenes footage. Clicking on each masterpiece reveals the individual stock photos used in their creation. 

    Released: June 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Adobe, Film
  • "Rembrandt"

    "Rembrandt"

    5 of 5
    Prev Next

    Stock imagery is rarely talked about in a positive light. Adobe is setting out to change that. Introducing “Make a Masterpiece.” Adobe challenged four digital artists from its Behance artist community to faithfully and intricately re-create lost, stolen or destroyed art using just Adobe Stock photography inside the Creative Cloud. 

    The artists and their assigned pieces of art included Karla Cordova (Ecuador) and Frida Kahlo’s The Wounded Table; Jean-Charles Debroize (France) and Caravaggio’s Saint Matthew and the Angel; Mike Campau (US) and Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s Cathedral Towering Over a Town; and Ankur Patar (India) and Rembrandt van Rijn’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee.

    The result is four re-creations of lost masterpieces created from thousands of Adobe Stock photographs that, without a second glance, could pass for the originals. The “Make a Masterpiece” experience is housed at http://www.adobestockmasterpiece.com/ and features the finished masterpieces as well as behind-the-scenes footage. Clicking on each masterpiece reveals the individual stock photos used in their creation. 

    Released: June 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Adobe, Film

#SquareShakes

Client:
SONIC Drive-In
  • SONIC #SquareShakes

    People are obsessed with capturing the world on Instagram, so we thought, “What if we manipulated the real world to fit it on Instagram?”

    GS&P launched a partnership with SONIC and Instagram celebrity @ChefJacquesLaMerde to introduce the world’s first product designed especially for Instagram: SONIC #SquareShakes. The SONIC Square Shake was entirely square, perfect for photographing and sharing, complete with a square cup and a square straw. 

    The shakes were available exclusively through “Shop Now” sponsored ads on Instagram for 2016 Coachella festivalgoers at the Base Camp festival grounds. Through the geotargeted ads, attendees could order the shakes and sample them on the spot—a first-of-its-kind program for Instagram. Samplers were then encouraged to share their Square Shakes on Instagram with the hashtag #SquareShakes, thus completing the Insta-circle.

    Released: April 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, SONIC Drive-In, Mobile, Social

Dreams of Dalí

Client:
The Dalí Museum
  • Dreams of Dalí

    When a piece of artwork really inspires you, sometimes you just want to jump inside it and wander around. And now you can. 

    “Dreams of Dalí” takes us inside the mind of the legendary surrealist Salvador Dalí by transporting us into one of his early paintings, Archeological Reminiscence of Millet’s “Angelus” (1935). Just put on the virtual-reality headset, and you’ll be able to move around inside the painting in a fully immersive 3-D environment. You’ll look beyond what was depicted in the original frame and even hear Dali’s possible thoughts as he was imagining his surreal world. 

    “We are excited that our partnership with the Dalí Museum has allowed us an opportunity to explore a new way to look at art,” remarked GS&P co-founder Jeff Goodby. “Dalí was a true visionary, and no other artist would be a better fit for this project.”

    “Dreams of Dalí” will be open to the public at the Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida. A 360-degree-video version of the experience, involving simpler VR gadgets like Google Cardboard or Samsung Gear VR, is also available at dreamsofdali.org. 

    Released: January 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, The Dalí Museum, Interactive, Film, Integrated, Mobile, Experiential