Free the Love

Client:
BAMPFA
  • Free the Love

    Free the Love

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    To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love, the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive is bringing the spirit of the ’60s into the tech age. In conjunction with its new exhibition, Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for Utopia, GS&P joined forces with BAMPFA and Adobe to create Free the Love, an augmented-reality app.

    The Free the Love app enables users to release augmented-reality “love balloons” into the skies across the Bay Area, with personal messages of peace, love, and togetherness inside. Using the app, people can write messages and leave their own love balloons throughout San Francisco and beyond. Using their phones’ cameras, users can also search the skies for love balloons released by others.

    The app’s design was inspired by many of the pieces of art in the Hippie Modernism exhibit, several of which are featured in the app’s educational “Love Tour.” Developed in partnership with the California Historical Society, the Love Tour highlights historical hippie sites of the Bay Area. Locations on the Love Tour include Wurster Hall on the UC Berkeley campus, People’s Park in Berkeley, Haight-Ashbury, the site of the first Earth Day, the Matrix nightclub in San Francisco, and the site of the Human Be-In, among others.

    Released: February 2017

    Tags:
    San Francisco, BAMPFA
  • Free the Love

    2 of 4
    Prev Next

    To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love, the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive is bringing the spirit of the ’60s into the tech age. In conjunction with its new exhibition, Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for Utopia, GS&P joined forces with BAMPFA and Adobe to create Free the Love, an augmented-reality app.

    The Free the Love app enables users to release augmented-reality “love balloons” into the skies across the Bay Area, with personal messages of peace, love, and togetherness inside. Using the app, people can write messages and leave their own love balloons throughout San Francisco and beyond. Using their phones’ cameras, users can also search the skies for love balloons released by others.

    The app’s design was inspired by many of the pieces of art in the Hippie Modernism exhibit, several of which are featured in the app’s educational “Love Tour.” Developed in partnership with the California Historical Society, the Love Tour highlights historical hippie sites of the Bay Area. Locations on the Love Tour include Wurster Hall on the UC Berkeley campus, People’s Park in Berkeley, Haight-Ashbury, the site of the first Earth Day, the Matrix nightclub in San Francisco, and the site of the Human Be-In, among others.

    Released: February 2017

    Tags:
    San Francisco, BAMPFA
  • Free the Love

    3 of 4
    Prev Next

    To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love, the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive is bringing the spirit of the ’60s into the tech age. In conjunction with its new exhibition, Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for Utopia, GS&P joined forces with BAMPFA and Adobe to create Free the Love, an augmented-reality app.

    The Free the Love app enables users to release augmented-reality “love balloons” into the skies across the Bay Area, with personal messages of peace, love, and togetherness inside. Using the app, people can write messages and leave their own love balloons throughout San Francisco and beyond. Using their phones’ cameras, users can also search the skies for love balloons released by others.

    The app’s design was inspired by many of the pieces of art in the Hippie Modernism exhibit, several of which are featured in the app’s educational “Love Tour.” Developed in partnership with the California Historical Society, the Love Tour highlights historical hippie sites of the Bay Area. Locations on the Love Tour include Wurster Hall on the UC Berkeley campus, People’s Park in Berkeley, Haight-Ashbury, the site of the first Earth Day, the Matrix nightclub in San Francisco, and the site of the Human Be-In, among others.

    Released: February 2017

    Tags:
    San Francisco, BAMPFA
  • Free the Love

    4 of 4
    Prev Next

    To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love, the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive is bringing the spirit of the ’60s into the tech age. In conjunction with its new exhibition, Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for Utopia, GS&P joined forces with BAMPFA and Adobe to create Free the Love, an augmented-reality app.

    The Free the Love app enables users to release augmented-reality “love balloons” into the skies across the Bay Area, with personal messages of peace, love, and togetherness inside. Using the app, people can write messages and leave their own love balloons throughout San Francisco and beyond. Using their phones’ cameras, users can also search the skies for love balloons released by others.

    The app’s design was inspired by many of the pieces of art in the Hippie Modernism exhibit, several of which are featured in the app’s educational “Love Tour.” Developed in partnership with the California Historical Society, the Love Tour highlights historical hippie sites of the Bay Area. Locations on the Love Tour include Wurster Hall on the UC Berkeley campus, People’s Park in Berkeley, Haight-Ashbury, the site of the first Earth Day, the Matrix nightclub in San Francisco, and the site of the Human Be-In, among others.

    Released: February 2017

    Tags:
    San Francisco, BAMPFA

Space Hotel

Client:
Cisco
  • Space Hotel

    To demonstrate how Cisco Spark’s bold collaboration platform allows teams to make the impossible possible, we brought together an interior designer, a space explorer, an astronautics professor and a travel expert to answer the question: With space tourism upon us, where will we stay?

    The result is the Space Hotel—an immersive 360 video tour of a galactic hotel that might only be a few years from reality given the technology already at our fingertips. The hotel includes a lobby, bedrooms, a dining area, an observation deck and the universe’s first zero-G swimming pool.

    The collaborators included David Barnhart, a professor of astronautics; interior designer Nicole Hollis, principal and creative director of NICOLEHOLLIS; Anousheh Ansari, the first female private space explorer; and Brian Kelly, founder and CEO of The Points Guy.

    The digital campaign is a continuation of Cisco’s campaign “There’s Never Been a Better Time,” which GS&P introduced in May 2016. The platform’s perpetual optimism fuels Cisco’s drive to make formerly outlandish ideas, like a space hotel, reality.

    Released: January 2017

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Cisco

Party Safe Bag

Client:
Tostitos
  • Party Safe Bag

    Party Safe Bag

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    Just in time for the big game on Sunday, February 5, we introduced for Tostitos the Party Safe Bag, the first bag of chips that gets you home safe.

    The limited-edition bags contain a sensor connected to a microcontroller calibrated to detect small traces of alcohol on a person’s breath. When any trace of alcohol is detected, the LEDs turn red and form a steering wheel, revealing an Uber code and a “Don’t drink and drive” message. Thanks to near-field-communication (NFC) technology, fans can also call for free rides by simply tapping their bags with their phones.

    Together with Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) and Uber,Tostitos will offer party-goers $10 off their Uber ride, providing over 25,000 safe rides. The rides - redeemable through all participating Tostitos bags nationwide - will be available during and after Sunday's game, February 5.

    Released: February 2017

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Tostitos
  • Party Safe Bag: "Don't"

    2 of 5
    Prev Next

    Just in time for the big game on Sunday, February 5, we introduced for Tostitos the Party Safe Bag, the first bag of chips that gets you home safe.

    The limited-edition bags contain a sensor connected to a microcontroller calibrated to detect small traces of alcohol on a person’s breath. When any trace of alcohol is detected, the LEDs turn red and form a steering wheel, revealing an Uber code and a “Don’t drink and drive” message. Thanks to near-field-communication (NFC) technology, fans can also call for free rides by simply tapping their bags with their phones.

    Together with Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) and Uber,Tostitos will offer party-goers $10 off their Uber ride, providing over 25,000 safe rides. The rides - redeemable through all participating Tostitos bags nationwide - will be available during and after Sunday's game, February 5.

    Released: January 2017

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Tostitos
  • Party Safe Bag: "OK"

    3 of 5
    Prev Next

    Just in time for the big game on Sunday, February 5, we introduced for Tostitos the Party Safe Bag, the first bag of chips that gets you home safe.

    The limited-edition bags contain a sensor connected to a microcontroller calibrated to detect small traces of alcohol on a person’s breath. When any trace of alcohol is detected, the LEDs turn red and form a steering wheel, revealing an Uber code and a “Don’t drink and drive” message. Thanks to near-field-communication (NFC) technology, fans can also call for free rides by simply tapping their bags with their phones.

    Together with Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) and Uber,Tostitos will offer party-goers $10 off their Uber ride, providing over 25,000 safe rides. The rides - redeemable through all participating Tostitos bags nationwide - will be available during and after Sunday's game, February 5.

    Released: January 2017

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Tostitos
  • Party Safe Bag: "Standby"

    4 of 5
    Prev Next

    Just in time for the big game on Sunday, February 5, we introduced for Tostitos the Party Safe Bag, the first bag of chips that gets you home safe.

    The limited-edition bags contain a sensor connected to a microcontroller calibrated to detect small traces of alcohol on a person’s breath. When any trace of alcohol is detected, the LEDs turn red and form a steering wheel, revealing an Uber code and a “Don’t drink and drive” message. Thanks to near-field-communication (NFC) technology, fans can also call for free rides by simply tapping their bags with their phones.

    Together with Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) and Uber,Tostitos will offer party-goers $10 off their Uber ride, providing over 25,000 safe rides. The rides - redeemable through all participating Tostitos bags nationwide - will be available during and after Sunday's game, February 5.

    Released: January 2017

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Tostitos
  • Party Safe Bag: "Off"

    5 of 5
    Prev Next

    Just in time for the big game on Sunday, February 5, we introduced for Tostitos the Party Safe Bag, the first bag of chips that gets you home safe.

    The limited-edition bags contain a sensor connected to a microcontroller calibrated to detect small traces of alcohol on a person’s breath. When any trace of alcohol is detected, the LEDs turn red and form a steering wheel, revealing an Uber code and a “Don’t drink and drive” message. Thanks to near-field-communication (NFC) technology, fans can also call for free rides by simply tapping their bags with their phones.

    Together with Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) and Uber,Tostitos will offer party-goers $10 off their Uber ride, providing over 25,000 safe rides. The rides - redeemable through all participating Tostitos bags nationwide - will be available during and after Sunday's game, February 5.

    Released: January 2017

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Tostitos

Poverty Line Prices

Client:
Tipping Point Community
  • Poverty Line Prices

    Poverty Line Prices

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    Imagine walking into a grocery store where every item is five times more expensive than it usually is. A store where milk is $24 and a monthly bus pass costs $365.

    That’s the unfortunate reality that the one in ten Bay Area families (788,000 individuals) living below the poverty line experiences every day. In large part due to high-paying jobs in Silicon Valley, the Bay Area’s median household income is $153,057—which, after taxes, is five times more than the earnings of those families living below the poverty line ($24,300). To raise awareness of this pay gap, we partnered with the Tipping Point to simulate the struggle of living below the poverty line.

    GS&P introduced “Poverty Line Prices” with a provocative film. We placed undercover cameras in a high-end San Francisco (Nob Hill) grocery store and filmed people’s reactions as they were charged prices five times higher than the real cost. 

    “The Bay Area is a tale of two cities: the haves and the have-nots,” said Rich Silverstein, co-chairman and partner at GS&P. “We wanted people to get a small sense of the reality of living below the poverty line so that they truly understand the importance of Tipping Point’s mission.” 

    We also created a coupon insert that features items with prices inflated by 500 percent. It will run in the San Francisco Chronicle on the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. The insert serves as a stark contrast to the Black Friday blockbuster discounts that typically appear in the issue. The campaign will drive to a mobile-first website, tippingpoint.org, that enables people to plug in their income to determine how expensive basic items seem for those living below the poverty line. On social networks, people are encouraged to share the campaign using the hashtag #PovertyLinePrices. 

    Released: November 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Tipping Point Community
  • Poverty Line Prices

    2 of 4
    Prev Next

    Imagine walking into a grocery store where every item is five times more expensive than it usually is. A store where milk is $24 and a monthly bus pass costs $365.

    That’s the unfortunate reality that the one in ten Bay Area families (788,000 individuals) living below the poverty line experiences every day. In large part due to high-paying jobs in Silicon Valley, the Bay Area’s median household income is $153,057—which, after taxes, is five times more than the earnings of those families living below the poverty line ($24,300). To raise awareness of this pay gap, we partnered with the Tipping Point to simulate the struggle of living below the poverty line.

    GS&P introduced “Poverty Line Prices” with a provocative film. We placed undercover cameras in a high-end San Francisco (Nob Hill) grocery store and filmed people’s reactions as they were charged prices five times higher than the real cost. 

    “The Bay Area is a tale of two cities: the haves and the have-nots,” said Rich Silverstein, co-chairman and partner at GS&P. “We wanted people to get a small sense of the reality of living below the poverty line so that they truly understand the importance of Tipping Point’s mission.” 

    We also created a coupon insert that features items with prices inflated by 500 percent. It will run in the San Francisco Chronicle on the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. The insert serves as a stark contrast to the Black Friday blockbuster discounts that typically appear in the issue. The campaign will drive to a mobile-first website, tippingpoint.org, that enables people to plug in their income to determine how expensive basic items seem for those living below the poverty line. On social networks, people are encouraged to share the campaign using the hashtag #PovertyLinePrices. 

    Released: November 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Tipping Point Community
  • Poverty Line Prices

    3 of 4
    Prev Next

    Imagine walking into a grocery store where every item is five times more expensive than it usually is. A store where milk is $24 and a monthly bus pass costs $365.

    That’s the unfortunate reality that the one in ten Bay Area families (788,000 individuals) living below the poverty line experiences every day. In large part due to high-paying jobs in Silicon Valley, the Bay Area’s median household income is $153,057—which, after taxes, is five times more than the earnings of those families living below the poverty line ($24,300). To raise awareness of this pay gap, we partnered with the Tipping Point to simulate the struggle of living below the poverty line.

    GS&P introduced “Poverty Line Prices” with a provocative film. We placed undercover cameras in a high-end San Francisco (Nob Hill) grocery store and filmed people’s reactions as they were charged prices five times higher than the real cost. 

    “The Bay Area is a tale of two cities: the haves and the have-nots,” said Rich Silverstein, co-chairman and partner at GS&P. “We wanted people to get a small sense of the reality of living below the poverty line so that they truly understand the importance of Tipping Point’s mission.” 

    We also created a coupon insert that features items with prices inflated by 500 percent. It will run in the San Francisco Chronicle on the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. The insert serves as a stark contrast to the Black Friday blockbuster discounts that typically appear in the issue. The campaign will drive to a mobile-first website, tippingpoint.org, that enables people to plug in their income to determine how expensive basic items seem for those living below the poverty line. On social networks, people are encouraged to share the campaign using the hashtag #PovertyLinePrices. 

    Released: November 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Tipping Point Community
  • Poverty Line Prices

    4 of 4
    Prev Next

    Imagine walking into a grocery store where every item is five times more expensive than it usually is. A store where milk is $24 and a monthly bus pass costs $365.

    That’s the unfortunate reality that the one in ten Bay Area families (788,000 individuals) living below the poverty line experiences every day. In large part due to high-paying jobs in Silicon Valley, the Bay Area’s median household income is $153,057—which, after taxes, is five times more than the earnings of those families living below the poverty line ($24,300). To raise awareness of this pay gap, we partnered with the Tipping Point to simulate the struggle of living below the poverty line.

    GS&P introduced “Poverty Line Prices” with a provocative film. We placed undercover cameras in a high-end San Francisco (Nob Hill) grocery store and filmed people’s reactions as they were charged prices five times higher than the real cost. 

    “The Bay Area is a tale of two cities: the haves and the have-nots,” said Rich Silverstein, co-chairman and partner at GS&P. “We wanted people to get a small sense of the reality of living below the poverty line so that they truly understand the importance of Tipping Point’s mission.” 

    We also created a coupon insert that features items with prices inflated by 500 percent. It will run in the San Francisco Chronicle on the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. The insert serves as a stark contrast to the Black Friday blockbuster discounts that typically appear in the issue. The campaign will drive to a mobile-first website, tippingpoint.org, that enables people to plug in their income to determine how expensive basic items seem for those living below the poverty line. On social networks, people are encouraged to share the campaign using the hashtag #PovertyLinePrices. 

    Released: November 2016

    Tags:
    San Francisco, Tipping Point Community